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Toilet Room Doors without Proper Maneuvering Clearances

Posted in: Truckstop Business, Americans with Disabilities Act

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Welcome to the newest post in our blog series, Top 20 ADA Compliance Issues Seen in Truckstops and Travel Plazas. Join guest post by contributor Brad GaskinsThe McIntosh Group on the second Friday of every month for his monthly column.

/// Guest post by contributor Brad GaskinsThe McIntosh Group

When reviewing the 2010 ADA Standards regarding accessible toilet rooms, the biggest change is the acknowledgement that toilet rooms need to be reconfigured to make it easier for side transfer. This will allow the ability to access the toilet and sink and still maneuver on and off the toilet and in and out of the toilet room with ease.

The biggest changes in section 604.3 of the ADA Standards for Accessible Design represent an adjustment in the clearance space required at toilets. Allowing more space increases the usability of accessible single-user toilet rooms by making side transfers possible that would not have been possible under the 1991 Standards. The additional space is also critical for those providing assistance with transfers and personal care for persons with disabilities.

Toilet room doors without proper maneuvering clearances are on the list of the top Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) compliance issues seen in truck stops and travel plazas. Below are comparisons of the different toilet room layouts.

 

COMPARISON OF SINGLE-USER TOILET ROOM LAYOUTS WITH IN-SWINGING DOOR

1991 STANDARDS

2010 STANDARDS

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Plan-2A: 1991 Standards Minimum with

In-Swinging Door

Plan-2B: 2010 Standards Minimum with In-Swinging

Door

5’-0” x 8’-6” • 42.50 Square Feet

7’-0” x 6’-6” • 45.50 Square Feet

This plan shows a typical example of a single-user toilet room that meets the minimum requirements of the 1991 Standards. Depending on the width of the hallway and other circulation issues, it can be preferable to swing the entry door into the toilet room. Businesses and public entities typically prefer to have an in-swinging door. The in-swinging door increases overall room size because it cannot swing over the required clear floor space at any accessible fixture, (see section 4.22.2 of the 1991 Standards). This increases the room depth from Plan-1A. The door is permitted to swing over the required turning space shown as a 60-inch circle.

 

This plan shows a typical example of a single-user toilet room that meets the minimum requirements of the 2010 Standards when the entry door swings into the room. In the 2010 Standards an exception allows the entry door to swing over the clear floor spaces and clearances required at the fixtures if a clear floor space complying with section 305.3 (minimum 30 inches by 48 inches) is provided outside the arc of the door swing, section 603.3.3 exception 2. The required maneuvering space for the door, section 404.2.4.1 and Figure 404.2.4.1(a), also is a factor in room size. This clear space cannot be obstructed by the plumbing fixtures. Note that this layout provides more space for turning when the door is closed than Plan-1B.

This layout is seven percent (7%) larger than the accompanying Plan-2A: 1991 Standards Minimum with In-Swinging Door example. 

As shown above, the 2010 Standards allows for in-swinging doors to swing into the required turning space, but not into the clear floor space required at any fixture.  In-swinging doors are allowed to swing into the fixture clear floor space if there is a clear floor space measuring at least 30 inches by 48 inches outside of the door swing.

Below are examples of single-user toilet room comparisons with an out-swinging door. Again, the 2010 standards allow for a different configuration more accommodating to the side transfer.

 

COMPARISON OF SINGLE-USER TOILET ROOM LAYOUTS WITH OUT-SWINGING DOOR

1991 Standards

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 Plan-1A: 1991 Standards Minimum with

Out-Swinging Door

5’-0” x 7’-3” • 36.25 Square Feet

This plan shows a typical example of a single-user toilet room that meets the minimum requirements of the 1991 Standards. The size of this space is determined by the minimum width required for the toilet and sink between the side walls, the minimum wheelchair turning space, and the space required for the out-swinging door. A sink with knee space can overlap the clear floor space required for the toilet provided that at least 36 inches of clearance is maintained between the side wall next to the toilet and the sink (see section 4.16.2 and Fig. 28 of the 1991 Standards). A wheelchair turning space meeting section 4.2.3 of the 1991 Standards must be provided. The size of this room requires that the entry door swing out. The room would be larger if the door were in-swinging.

 

2010 Standards 

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 Plan-1B: 2010 Standards Minimum with

Out-Swinging Door

7’-0” x 5’-0” • 35.00 Square Feet

This plan shows a typical example of a single-user toilet room that meets the minimum requirements of the 2010 Standards. Features include: five-foot minimum width between the side wall of the toilet and the sink; 60-inch minimum circular wheelchair turning space; and 36-inch by 48-inch clear maneuvering space for the out-swinging entry door. Section 604.3.1 of the 2010 Standards requires a floor clearance at a toilet that is a minimum of 60 inches wide by 56 inches deep regardless of approach. Section 604.3.2 prohibits any other plumbing fixtures from being located in this clear space, except in residential dwelling units. The 2010 Standards, at section 304.3, allows the turning space to extend into toe and knee space provided beneath fixtures and other elements. Required maneuvering space for the entry door (inside the room) must be clear of all fixtures. If the door had both a closer and latch, section 404.2.4.1 and Figure 404.2.4.1(c) require additional space on the latch side.

This layout is three point five percent (3.5%) smaller than the accompanying Plan-1A: 1991 Standards Minimum with Out-Swinging Door example.

 

 

2010 Standards

 Plan-1C: 2010 Standards Minimum with

Out-Swinging Door

(entry door has both closer and latch)

7’-0” x 5’-6” • 38.50 Square Feet

This plan shows the same typical features of a single-user toilet room that meets the minimum requirements of the 2010 Standards as Plan-1B does except the entry door has both a closer and latch. Because the door has both a closer and latch, a minimum additional foot of maneuvering space is required on the latch side (see section 404.2.4.1 and Figure 404.2.4.1(c) of the 2010 Standards).

This layout is six point two percent (6.2%) larger than the accompanying Plan-1A: 1991 Standards Minimum with Out-Swinging Door example.

 

Finally, the plan below shows a single-user toilet room that is compliant in both the 1991 and 2010 regulations.

1991 Standards and 2010 Standards 

Plan-3: Meets Both 1991 Standards and 2010 Standards

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7’-0” x 5’-9” • 40.25 Square Feet

This plan shows an example of a single-user toilet room that meets the minimum requirements of both the 1991 Standards and 2010 Standards. A T-shaped turning space has been used (see Fig. 3(a) of the 1991 Standards and Figure 304.3.2 of the 2010 Standards) to maintain a compact room size. An out-swinging door also minimizes the overall layout depth and cannot swing over the required clear floor space or clearance at any accessible plumbing fixture.

This layout is eleven percent (11%) larger than the Plan-1A: 1991 Standards Minimum with Out-Swinging Door example shown at the beginning of these plan comparisons.

Next month we’ll discuss the issue of sinks mounted higher than the allowable height and not enough knee and toe clearance under the sink. This will be the first of several posts regarding ADA compliance issues we see in restrooms at truck stops and travel plazas.

 

/// Read more Top 20 ADA Compliance Issues Seen in Truckstops and Travel Plazas posts here

Photo Credit: The McIntosh Group

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Editor's note: Gaskins was a Human Library expert at The NATSO Show. The NATSO Show 2014 will be January 25-29 in Nashville, TN. Learn more about The NATSO Show 2014 here- AT

{Guest Post} Guest post provided by NATSO Allied member Brad GaskinsThe McIntosh Group. The McIntosh Group is an architecture firm focused on providing accessibility solutions for clients nationwide. Learn more about The McIntosh Group.

The opinions and advice given by guest post contributors are not necessarily those of NATSO Inc. The posts should not be considered legal advice. Qualified professionals should be sought regarding advice and questions specific to your circumstances.

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About the Author

Brad Gaskins, AIA, CASp

Brad Gaskins, AIA, CASp

Brad has more than 25 years experience in the practice of architecture and a comprehensive understanding of professional practice nationwide. Brad brings a unique and valuable perspective to The McIntosh Group’s practice and clients, with a specific expertise in the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and national building codes.  Brad has gained recognition as an expert witness for clients with ADA compliance complaints. He represents NACS, The Association for Convenience and Fuel Retailing, as a full voting member on the International Code Council (ICC), American National Standards Institute (ANSI) A117.1, Consensus Committee on Accessible and Usable Buildings and Facilities. His objective is to share, with the committee for their deliberations, the potential impact of the standards on the convenience store and truckstop industry. Brad has an undergraduate degree in engineering and a master’s degree in architecture from the University of Oklahoma. He is currently serving as president of AIA Oklahoma. 

Got questions about ADA guidelines? Let Brad help, he’s the ADA Geek.

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The “Ask Brad” website educates visitors on the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). The site offers the knowledge of an architect, Brad, who has a specific expertise in ADA compliance. Visitors to the site are encouraged to submit questions regarding the ADA. Brad will answer the questions and post them to the site for all to take advantage. In addition to the Q&A section, the site offers timely information through instructional videos, white papers, articles and resource links.

 

Please visit the site at www.askbrad.info.